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Rivarossi HO HR2355 & HR2356 Chesapeake and Ohio Allegheny 2-6-6-6 steam locomotive


Rivarossi HO HR2355 & HR2356 Chesapeake and Ohio Allegheny 2-6-6-6 steam locomotives are an articulated type with 2 leading wheels, and two sets of six driving wheels and six trailing wheels. There were two classes of the 2-6-6-6 type where built, represented here is the "Allegheny" class built by the Lima Locomotive Works. This locomotive classified as the Chesapeake and Ohio class H-8 saw its first service with the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway beginning in 1941, and these were the heaviest reciprocating steam locomotives ever built and were used till 1956. There are only two surviving Alleghenies. One resides in The Henry Ford museum in Dearborn, Michigan, and the other at the B&O Railroad Museum in Baltimore, Maryland. Neither is in operational condition and they are likely to remain static displays given their incredible size and weight.
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Rivarossi HO HR2355 2-6-6-6 Allegheny, Chesapeake and Ohio #1644 (DCC Ready)
Retail Price: $469.99
Our Price: $369.99
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Rivarossi HO HR2355 2-6-6-6 Allegheny, Chesapeake and Ohio #1644 (DCC Ready)
The Allegheny was first produced for the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway for the coal runs from the terminal in Hinton, West Virginia and 80 miles to the east to Clifton Forge, Virginia.  The locomotive‚Äôs name came from the steep climb through the mountain range of the same name.  Two Alleghenies were needed to take the 10,000 ton loads of coal up to the summit at 2,072 feet, one pushing and one pulling, once the summit was reached, one Allegheny could pull the rest of the trip.

Lima Locomotive Works built the first sixty of the 2-6-6-6 Class H-8 Allegheny from 1941 to 1948.  The Allegheny weighed in as the heaviest steam locomotive ever produced weighing in at 1.5 million pounds.  The 2-6-6-6 wheel arrangement was to help evenly distribute the weight on the rails that accumulated towards the back of the locomotive.  A six-wheeling trailing truck was needed to help support the weight of the firebox also allowing the engine to become the most powerful reaching up to 7,500 horsepower.  The last working Allegheny was removed in 1956 opening up a new era to diesel locomotives, but the Allegheny would always be remembered as an American icon.
   
 
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